Merge Sort in Python

Published on 17 February 2019 (Updated: 17 February 2019)

Merge Sort in Python

In this article, we’ll be tackling Merge Sort in Python.

How to Implement the Solution

At this point, let’s dig into the code a bit. The following sections break down the Merge Sort in Python functionality.

Solution

#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys


def merge_sort(xs):
    def sort(xs):
        if len(xs) <= 0:
            return []
        if len(xs) == 1:
            return xs
        return sort([merge(xs[0], xs[1])] + sort(xs[2:]))
    split_xs = [[x] for x in xs]
    return sort(split_xs)[0]


def merge(xs, ys):
    if len(xs) <= 0:
        return ys
    if len(ys) <= 0:
        return xs
    if xs[0] < ys[0]:
        return [xs[0]] + merge(xs[1:], ys)
    return [ys[0]] + merge(xs, ys[1:])


def input_list(list_str):
    return [int(x.strip(" "), 10) for x in list_str.split(',')]


def exit_with_error():
    print('Usage: please provide a list of at least two integers to sort in the format “1, 2, 3, 4, 5”')
    sys.exit(1)


def main(args):
    try:
        xs = input_list(args[0])
        if len(xs) <= 1:
            exit_with_error()
        print(merge_sort(xs))
    except (IndexError,ValueError):
        exit_with_error()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    main(sys.argv[1:])

The Main Function

Breaking down this solution bottom up,

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main(sys.argv[1:])

This bit of code checks to see if this is the main module run. If it is it then calls the main function and passes user input to it. In this case the user input would be a string of numbers like so "2, 1, 10, 5, 3" (to sort).

def main(args):
    try:
        xs = input_list(args[0])
        if len(xs) <= 1:
            exit_with_error()
        print(selection_sort(xs))
    except (IndexError,ValueError):
        exit_with_error()

This is the main function of this file. It parses the input, then calls our selection sort function (and prints the results). It also deals with any errors raised.

Transform Input Parameters

def input_list(list_str):
    return [int(x.strip(" "), 10) for x in list_str.split(',')]

This function takes a string like "2, 1, 10, 5, 3", and turns into a list of numbers. It does this using a list comprehension. First, we need to convert our string into a list list_str.split(',') which is a list of strings split by comma (,). As a result, our original input string becomes ["2", " 1", " 10", " 5", " 3"]. Then for each element in the list for x in ... , we do something to it.

In this example we convert it into a decimal integer, int(x.strip(" "), 10) x.strip(" "), removes any whitespace so " 1" becomes "1", then int("1", 10) converts the string "1" into a decimal number in this case 1. This is done for every item in the list so our original input of "2, 1, 10, 5, 3" becomes [2, 1, 10, 5, 3].

Throw Errors

def exit_with_error():
    print('Usage: please provide a list of at least two integers to sort in the format “1, 2, 3, 4, 5”')
    sys.exit(1)

This function prints a message and then exits the script with an error, sys.exit(1). If any non-zero value is returned then the program didn’t complete properly. This function is called if the user input isn’t correct.

Merge

def merge(xs, ys):
    if len(xs) <= 0:
        return ys
    if len(ys) <= 0:
        return xs
    if xs[0] < ys[0]:
        return [xs[0]] + merge(xs[1:], ys)
    return [ys[0]] + merge(xs, ys[1:])

This function is used to sort two list together (xs and ys). There are different conditions we must account for. The first two conditions check if either of the lists are empty. There are a few ways to check if a list if empty such as not xs but in this case we are checking if the length of the list is less than or equal to 0 len(xs) <= 0. If either of the lists xs or ys, then we return the non empty list. So if xs is empty we will return the list ys.

The next thing we check for is if the first element of xs is less than the ys, We can get the first element of a list like so xs[0], then we return [xs[0]] + merge(xs[1:], ys). This is an example of recursion where the function calls itself within the function, in this case the merge() function calling the merge() function again.

Since xs[0] is less than y[0] we know xs[0] must be the smallest item in either list, as both lists are already sorted. So we then take xs[0] out of the first list, and we convert it into a list [xs[0]] because we want to concatenate it with a sorted list. The + operator can be used to concatenate two lists together.

We call merge(xs[1:], ys) to sort the remaining items in both lists. Where xs[1:] is the list xs without the first element. This is called index splicing in Python, you can learn more about it here. We don’t include the first element of xs because we already know it’s the smallest element in both lists. The final line return [ys[0]] + merge(xs, ys[1:]) is the same as line above except in this case ys[0] is smaller than xs[0] hence we use ys[0] at the start of the list concatenation instead of xs[0]. The reason this isn’t surrounded by an else statement is because of the return statement. Nothing will be executed after it.

Let’s take a look at an example, where xs = [3, 4] and ys = [1, 10]

Merge 1:

Merge 2:

Merge 3

Merge 4

Going backwards

Merge Sort

def merge_sort(xs):
    def sort(xs):
        if len(xs) <= 0:
            return []
        if len(xs) == 1:
            return xs
        return sort([merge(xs[0], xs[1])] + sort(xs[2:]))
    split_xs = [[x] for x in xs]
    return sort(split_xs)[0]

This is the function that actually sorts our entire list.

    def merge_sort(xs):
        def sort(xs):

This is known as closure nested functions (a function within another function). The nested function can access variables of the enclosing scope. They can read variables but cannot edit them. In the example above, the xs variable is our unsorted list.

The sort() function only exists within the scope of merge_sort() but other than that is works exactly the same as a normal function.

split_xs = [[x] for x in xs]
return sort(split_xs)[0]

In this example, we execute the above lines. First. you can ignore the sort() function until it’s called within merge_sort(). split_xs = [[x] for x in xs] splits our lists into separate lists. It takes each element with in xs and turns it into a list [x]. So split_xs is now a list of lists. If xs = [3, 10, 5] then split_xs = [[3], [10], [5]]. The final sorted result will look something like this [[3, 5, 10]] another list of lists hence we want to return the first element sort(split_xs)[0].

def sort(xs):
    if len(xs) <= 0:
        return []
    if len(xs) == 1:
        return xs
    return sort([merge(xs[0], xs[1])] + sort(xs[2:]))

So what happens in the sort() function lets take a look. Using our example above the function would be called by sort([[3], [10], [5]]). The first if statement checks if the xs list is empty by checking that the length is less than or equal to 0 len(xs) <= 0. If so, we return an empty list return []. The second statement checks if the list xs contains a single element len(xs) == 1. If it does, we return the list return xs. Finally if the list xs has more than 1 element return sort([merge(xs[0], xs[1])] + sort(xs[2:])).

Breaking this down this is another example of a recursive function, the sort() function is calling itself. Breaking down the argument passed to the sort function, [merge(xs[0], xs[1])] here we call our merge() function with the first two items of the xs list, then we convert the returned element into a list, hence being surronded by []. The second part of the argument sort(xs[2:]) calls the sort() function again but without the first two elements of xs, again using list comprehension.

We then combine these two lists together using list concatenation using the plus + operator [merge(xs[0], xs[1])] + sort(xs[2:]. Taking a look at an example where xs = [[4], [10], [9], [5]] the final sort function would look like sort([merge([4], [10]) + sort([[9], [5]])).

Lets take a look at how we would sort the list xs = [4, 3, 1, 10]

Sort 1

Sort 2

Sort 3

Going Backwards (Sort 2)

Sort

Going Backwards (Sort 1)

Sort

So

How to Run Solution

If we want to run this program, we should probably download a copy of Selection Sort in Python. After that, we should make sure we have the latest Python interpreter. From there, we can run the following command in the terminal:

python merge-sort.py "3, 2, 10, 6, 1, 7"

Alternatively, we can copy the solution into an online Python interpreter and hit run.